SATURDAY COOKING: DAHL

This is last week’s recipe that I haven’t had a chance to post.

It’s a DAHL recipe from Karen Martini’s cookbook “Everyday”.

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1 tablespoon olive oil
2 brown onions, finely diced
3 garlic cloves, finely chopped
5-cm piece of ginger, finely chopped
1 long green chilli, split lengthways
3 tablespoons ground cumin
3 tablespoons ground coriander
2 tablespoons ground turmeric
1/2 tablespoon ground cardamom
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
2.5 litres vegetable stock
350g red lentils, rinsed and picked over
200g brown lentils
1 * 400g tin kidney beans, drained
2 teaspoons salt flakes, or to taste
3 tablespoons tomato paste
2 handfuls of chopped coriander, to serve
2 tablespoons plain yogurt, to serve
juice of 1 lemon, to serve
flat bread, to serve

Serves 4

Method:

  1. Heat the oil in a large saucepan over medium heat, add the onion, garlic and ginger and cook, stirring often, for 6 minutes until the onion is translucent. Stir in the chilli and spices and cook for another minute.
  2. Stirring constantly, add the stock, red and brown lentils, kidney beans and salt to the pan. Bring to the boil, turn down the heat to low, cover and let the soup simmer for about 20 minutes, or until the lentils are very tender.
  3. Stir in the tomato paste and cook for several minutes more until it is a thick, soupy consistency. Add water if necessary.
  4. Serve topped with coriander, yogurt, a squeeze of lemon and flat bread alongside.
  5. Eat!

I made only half the recipe, and that was a lot! I think if you make the whole quantity, you can easily serve 6  as a main or 8 as a side dish.
I made my own version of raita to serve with the dahl: yogurt, garlic, cucumber and salt.
I also don’t like brown lentils, so I used toor dahl instead (which is a kind of lentil but yellow). It needed more cooking time for the toor dhal to be tender.
Make sure you keep an eye towards the end of the cooking, because the dahl thickens quite quickly  and you don’t want it to burn at the bottom of the saucepan.

 

 

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